Visit the College of Arts and Sciences

    Virtual Classroom Experience

    The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is the intellectual and cultural heart of the University of Delaware. We foster excellence in scholarship, creative work and public service, educating students to be thoughtful, ethical and engaged leaders. Whether you want a sneak peek of your program or want to sit in on an interdisciplinary course, we invite you to join the CAS Classroom Experience! Opportunities will be available to sit in on both in person and virtual courses.

    For the class visits, see the available times under the course listing and click on the calendar at the end of the column to reserve your spot.

    Can’t find the opportunity that’s right for you? Contact the College of Arts and Sciences at cascommteam@udel.edu to be matched to an experience that fits your schedule and interests.

    The Office of Undergraduate Admissions hosts a variety of tours (both in-person and virtual) and information sessions that complement the CAS Virtual Classroom Experiences. Go to udel.edu/visitUD for more information.

    Sit in on a class

    Social and Natural Sciences Classroom Opportunities

    Biological Sciences

    This course focuses on the molecular basis of life, energy transformations and the structure and function of cells, including signal transduction pathways. Students will also study classical Mendelian genetics and the flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

    This course focuses on the molecular basis of life, energy transformations and the structure and function of cells, including signal transduction pathways. Students will also study classical Mendelian genetics and the flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This class explores the principles of underlying function of organisms at the organ system level, ionic composition and regulation, respiration, circulation, nutritive metabolism, excretion and neuromuscular activity.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 8:40 a.m. to 9:55 a.m.


    Chemistry

    This course is the first half of a general chemistry sequence designed for students majoring in engineering or sciences other than chemistry. CHEM 103 is an active-learning course where students will be dynamically participating in the lectures and engaging in the course material. This course provides students with foundational knowledge of chemistry that can be applied to a variety of disciplines, including engineering, environmental science, material science, biophysics, geology, nutrition and medicine.

    Availability: Mondays & Wednesdays from 8:40 a.m. to 9:55 a.m. and Tuesdays & Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.


    Communications

    This course explores the philosophical foundations of different communication theories. From philosophy, psychology and linguistics to anthropology and technology, coursework empowers students by giving them ideas and concepts to put into practice.

    Availability: Wednesdays from 12:20 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.


    Fashion & Apparel Studies

    This course focuses on asic clothing construction procedures, fitting techniques and methods of evaluation for apparel are addressed. Construction skills are developed through a set of seam samples and construction of a blouse and skirt using a commercial pattern. 

    Availability: 11/15/2021, 11/17/2021, & 11/29/2021 from 10:10 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

    This course serves as an introduction to apparel product development, apparel garment analysis, basic textiles and sewing methods, as well as an introduction to the product development calendar and the tech pack, sizing and fit, costing, overview of production and technology used in apparel product development.

    Availability: 11/15/2021 from 9:05 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. or 12:20 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

    The course previews the product development process as applied in the apparel industry with a focus on business planning, marketing, market research, distribution, the product development calendar and challenges relating to apparel business situations. Students will evaluate how product development activities support sustainability as this course builds on basic information learned in FASH 180.

    Availability: 11/16/2021, 11/18/2021, & 11/30/2021 from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

    In this course, a merchandise budget developed in FASH 330 is translated into an inventory unit plan. Emphasis is on assortment planning, as well as responsible sourcing and purchasing. Computer applications are involved.

    Availability: 11/16/2021 & 11/30/2021 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

    This course introduces students to the special characteristics inherent in working with fine gauge knits and stretch-woven fabrications. Exploring a combination of draping, fitting, sloper developing and patternmaking techniques, students create samples and garments using specialized machinery. Using their understanding of stretch fundamentals, they design and execute original stretch designs.

    Availability: 11/15/2021, 11/17/2021, and 11/29/2021 from 1:25 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

    This course integrates advanced apparel design techniques and experiences as students design a collection of ensembles based on a theme incorporating social, cultural and environmental sustainability. Articulating the design process through oral, written and visual methods is emphasized.

    Availability: 11/15/2021, 11/17/2021, & 11/29/2021 from 1:25 p.m. to 4:25 p.m. and 11/16/2021 & 11/18/2021 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.


    Political Science & International Relations

    Students interested in classroom visits and shadowing a student in the UD Department of Political Science and International Relations are encouraged to fill out an interest form and the department will be in touch to coordinate the opportunity.
    Request a personalized UD Political Science and International Relations experience.


    Psychological & Brain Sciences

    Introduction to the process of psychological science. Includes coverage of research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, cognitive psychology, abnormal behavior and treatment, developmental psychology, and social and personality psychology.

    Availability: 11/16/2021, 12/2/2021, & 12/7/2021 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This course describes the nature of human language, how it is used to speak and comprehend and how it is learned. Subtopics include language and thought, animal communication and language in special populations, such as children born deaf or blind.

    Availability: 11/15/2021 from 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

    An analysis of theory and research in developmental psychology including the topics of developmental processes, developmental risk, systems theory and contemporary social issues.

    Availability: 11/12/2021, 11/17/2021, & 11/19/2021 from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

    This course focuses on the exploration of research on diagnosis, etiology and treatment of major pathological disorders with an emphasis on original research articles, class discussion and assessment instruments, in addition to analysis of video-taped interviews with patients used to illustrate the disorders.

    Availability: 11/18/2021 & 11/30/2021 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

    This course explores the origins of antisocial and criminal behavior from a psychological perspective, as well as theoretical and empirical material pertaining to the development of antisocial behavior, including risk factors, antisocial trajectories across the lifespan, personality factors and treatment/assessment.

    Availability: 11/16/2021 & 11/18/2021 from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

    This course examines stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination and minority experience from a social psychological perspective. Moreover, course materials will highlight the impact of self-relevant identities and political ideologies from a scientific perspective as students review key theories and findings, focusing on classic papers, contemporary research and current debates.

    Availability: 11/16/2021 from 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

    Covers topics studied by both psychologists and neuroscientists: biological bases of behavior, cognitive, developmental, and social psychology, and psychopathology. Recommended for neuroscience majors.

    Availability: 11/16/2021, 11/18/2021, & 11/30/2021 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This course covers the functional organization of the nervous system with emphasis on the brain stem, cranial nerves, limbic system and cerebral cortex. Surveys basic etiology, signs and symptoms of injury to spinal pathways, sensory-motor systems, methods of neurologic testing and the Mental Status Exam.

    Availability: 11/15/2021, 11/17/2021, & 11/29/2021 from 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

    Examines the effects of localized brain trauma on cognitive, personality, and psychosocial functioning. Focuses on neuropsychological assessment, intervention and common neuropathological syndromes.

    Availability: 11/12/2021, 11/15/2021, 11/17/2021, 11/19/2021, & 11/29/2021 from 3:35 p.m. to 4:25 p.m.


    Women & Gender Studies

    Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies explores the manner in which "gender" intersects with race, sexuality, nationality, class and other identities that shape systems of power. This course investigates popular culture, media and scholarly works to explore representations of power while providing students with tools to critique and find solutions to inequality.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. or 12:20 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

    Feminist theory offers a gender-centric approach for understanding, critiquing, and re-imagining politics and society. Feminists offer a broad understanding of politics, ranging from formal political institutions within the state, to the operation of gendered power relations in our everyday lives. At the same time, understanding feminist theory requires us to dive into a series of debates about each of its component parts. What is feminism, and who are (or should be) its beneficiaries? What are appropriate foundations for feminist theorizing? In this course, we will address key questions, concepts and controversies in feminist theory. Through assigned reading, class discussion and written essays, we will explore liberal, radical, socialist, intersectional, poststructural and other feminisms, and how these different perspectives address questions of identity, equality, justice and freedom.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

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    Humanities Classroom Opportunities

    History

    This course is a survey of the global economic, political, social and intellectual trends from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century, focusing especially on the shift of wealth and power from Asia to Europe during that period. As such, comprehensive coverage of specific areas of the world is secondary to the development of global interrelationships that gave rise to the modern world.

    Availability: Fridays from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.


    Languages, Literature, & Culture and European Studies

    Introduction to the contemporary Mandarin Chinese language through developing listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills, including mastery of the pinyin pronunciation system and introduction to Chinese characters.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 2:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. or Tuesdays 2:00 p.m. to 2:50 p.m.

    Students in this course participate in the reading and discussion of French literature, frequent compositions and grammar review where appropriate.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 p.m.

    A variable-topic course examining French and/or Francophone literature in its historical and cultural contexts that teaches reading strategies and tools for textual analysis applicable to literature, as well as other disciplines.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 p.m. or 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This course prepares students to read ancient Greek literary works in the original language, emphasizes building a basic vocabulary and acquiring essential grammar and includes discussion of ancient Greek culture and civilization.

    Availability: Tuesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This course focuses on the reading and discussion of 20th-century German short stories and novellas, including several short compositions.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    This course explores France's experience of three major wars: World War One, World War Two and the Algerian War of Independence -- and studies how each of these wars had an impact on civilians as well as soldiers, the moral dilemmas they posed and the legacies they left.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

    This course allows students to dive into political, socioeconomic and cultural developments in the Soviet Union from 1917 to 1990. 

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 9:05 a.m. to 9:55 a.m.

    This class focuses on the practical use of Italian by means of oral reports and discussions with an emphasis on improvement of basic conversational skills.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.

    This course focuses on the development of aural, oral, reading and writing skills at the intermediate Japanese level, including continued practice in identifying and reproducing Kanji characters, handling a greater variety of formality levels and verb forms.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. or Tuesdays 2:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

    The goal of this course is to build upper intermediate level grammar, vocabulary and Kanji with specific emphasis on fluency. All areas of language (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) are emphasized.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

    Prepares students to read ancient Roman literary works in the original language while emphasizing building a basic vocabulary and acquiring essential grammar.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

    Cultural, especially cross-cultural, study with primary emphasis on the historical development of the announced area, e.g. Nature in the Ancient World, Speculative Fiction and Transformation of a Myth.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

    Students will receive an introduction to the Russian language and focus on the development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through the use of basic texts.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. or 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

    This course will present an overview of Spanish geography, history, art and society through the study of the most important events in the history of the country that is now known as Spain from prehistoric times to the present day.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 9:05 a.m. to 9:55 a.m.

    Study of topics in Hispanic culture and civilization, ranging through the geography, history, art and society of Spain and Latin American countries.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 11:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m.


    Philosophy

    An examination of such central philosophical problems as ethics, theories of knowledge, the nature of reality, philosophy of religion and political philosophy.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

    The course considers some important topics in contemporary political philosophy, including political responsibility, distributive justice, democracy and political obligation. The issues considered include the problem of dirty hands, the problem of many hands, libertarianism, liberalism, democracy, epistocracy, political obligation and civil disobedience.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    The moral issues considered in this course include abortion, genetic enhancement, euthanasia, the death penalty, recreational use of drugs, sexual intimacy and marriage, motherhood and the workplace, freedom of speech, global justice, war and terrorism, animal rights and environmental ethics. Students will learn relevant arguments from both sides. The aim is to help students to develop and defend their own views.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

    In this course, students will take a critical yet sympathetic view of a wide range of religious traditions, including Native American Religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

    This course is a study of works of the major philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, including Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. In reading these works, students will come to understand some of their main positions and arguments in metaphysics and epistemology. In addition, students will come to appreciate how these discussions have shaped our contemporary understanding of such core philosophical problems as the nature of minds, what the physical world is like and what we can know about it, causation and personal identity.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

    In this course, students will learn about the works of several important thinkers in the Chinese philosophical traditions, including the Confucians, Daoists, Mohists, Buddhists, Neo-Daoists and Neo-Confucians.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 12:20 p.m. to 1:10 p.m.

    Metaphysics is the study of how and what things really are. Modern analytic metaphysics has been especially concerned with modality (the nature of necessity and possibility), personal identity, the mind & body problem, the nature of time, causation and freedom of the will; and has been characterized by a fine attention to language and logic. This course is designed to touch on all these concerns, with a focus on modality, an area which in the 1980s saw the publication of two revolutionary works by Saul Kripke and David Lewis.

    Availability: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

    This course explores ethical problems associated with environmental protection, local, national and international, as well as their relation to social and political movements in a seminar format.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

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    The Arts Classroom Opportunities

    Art Conservation

    This course is an introduction to the field through exposure to Winterthur Museum, Library and Garden and current art conservation projects.

    Availability: Tuesdays from 5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

    Step into this lecture-studio presentation covering analytical and practical aspects of mixing and matching colorants without instrumentation, including a focus on pigments, dyes and the manufacture of paint studied. Major topics include color interaction and the Munsell system of color description.

    Availability: Mondays & Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

    This beginning level course is designed to introduce students to both the fundamentals of working with clay and the fundamentals of an artistic practice. Process and engaged investigation will be emphasized with strong encouragement for experimentation and creativity. Questions to be considered include the following: “What does it mean to live and do art? What does it mean to form a three-dimensional object or structure out of dust/dirt/okay, let’s call it clay?”

    Availability: Mondays & Wednesdays from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

    This course examines the philosophy, ethics and practice of material culture preservation and the issues pertaining to collections management of cultural property. Typical deterioration characteristics and preventive conservation alternatives will also be presented and discussed.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

    This conservation internship course allows students to work with a University of Delaware faculty member on campus or at the Winterthur Museum in order to cultivate a familiarity with the museum field.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

    This conservation-focused capstone course allows students to work with a University of Delaware faculty member on campus or at the Winterthur Museum in order to cultivate a familiarity with the museum field.

    Availability: Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

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